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September 2, 2018

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Safety of IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, bipolar disorder, and others

August 10, 2018

NOVA Health Recovery

 

Researchers at Yale published a new study titled “Acute and Longer-Term Outcomes Using Ketamine as a Clinical Treatment at the Yale Psychiatric Hospital” in Clinical Psychiatry.  In late 2014, Yale began providing ketamine as an off-label therapy on a case-by-case basis for patients who could not participate in research protocols.  The authors observed 54 patients that received IV ketamine infusion for the treatment of severe and treatment-resistant mood disorders such as depression.

“Ketamine is being used as an off-label treatment for depression by an increasing number of providers, yet there is very little long-term data on patients who have received ketamine for more than just a few weeks,” Samuel T. Wilkinson, MD,from the department of psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine and Yale Psychiatric Hospital, told Healio Psychiatry.

The Yale researchers studied the acute and longer-term outcomes in this patient population. Importantly, a subset of patients (n=14) received ketamine on a long-term basis, ranging from 12 to 45 total treatments, over a course of 14 to 126 weeks.  The researchers found no evidence of cognitive decline, increased proclivity to delusions, or emergence of symptoms consistent with cystitis in this subset of long-term ketamine patients.  They also reported that the infusions were generally well-tolerated.

Although this study population was relatively small, limiting the conclusions that can be drawn, this is still an important first step in establishing the long-term safety of ketamine for the treatment of a myriad of diseases that it’s being used to treat.

 

Acute and Longer-Term Outcomes Using Ketamine as a Clinical Treatment at the Yale Psychiatric Hospital

 

Samuel T. Wilkinson, MD; Rachel B. Katz, MD; Mesut Toprak, MD; Ryan Webler, BA; Robert B. Ostroff, MD; and Gerard Sanacora, MD, PhD

 

J Clin Psychiatry 2018;79(4):17m11731

10.4088/JCP.17m11731

 

Objective: Ketamine has emerged as a rapid-acting antidepressant, though controversy remains whether sufficient data exist to justify its use outside of research protocols. In October 2014, the authors’ institution began providing ketamine as an off-label therapy on a case-by-case basis for patients unable to participate in research protocols. Here, the participant experience during 29 months of providing ketamine as a clinical treatment for severe and treatment-resistant mood disorders through February 2017 is described.

Methods: Patients were initially treated with a single- or double-infusion protocol (0.5 mg/kg for 40 minutes intravenously) and were later transitioned to a 4-infusion protocol over 2 weeks.

Results: Fifty-four patients received ketamine, with 518 total infusions performed. A subset of 44 patients with mood disorders initiated the 4-infusion protocol, of whom 45.5% responded and 27.3% remitted by the fourth infusion. A subsample (n = 14) received ketamine on a long-term basis, ranging from 12 to 45 total treatments, over a course of 14 to 126 weeks. No evidence was found of cognitive decline, increased proclivity to delusions, or emergence of symptoms consistent with cystitis in this subsample.

Conclusions: In general, ketamine infusions were tolerated well. The response and remission rates in this clinical sample were lower than those observed in some research protocols. The small number of patients who were treated on a maintenance schedule limits the conclusions that can be drawn regarding the long-term safety of ketamine; however, no long-term adverse effects were observed in this sample.

 

If you are interested in Ketamine therapies for depression, PTSD, pain, anxiety, fibromyalgia.......call 703-844-0184.

 

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